Warning: Illegal string offset 'html' in /home3/c7gen/public_html/cache/skin_cache/cacheid_20/skin_topic.php on line 909

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home3/c7gen/public_html/cache/skin_cache/cacheid_20/skin_topic.php:909) in /home3/c7gen/public_html/admin/sources/classes/output/formats/html/htmlOutput.php on line 114

Warning: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /home3/c7gen/public_html/cache/skin_cache/cacheid_20/skin_topic.php:909) in /home3/c7gen/public_html/admin/sources/classes/output/formats/html/htmlOutput.php on line 127
I am confused about fiqh - 7th Century Generation

Jump to content


- - - - -

I am confused about fiqh


8 replies to this topic

#1 Guest_Confused_*

  • Guests

Posted 06 August 2011 - 12:06 PM

:salam:

Insha'Allah everyone is having a good Ramadhaan.

I really need help/ I have read so much about fiqh, and I feel even more confused now. I do not know whether to follow the way of the salaf (and if I do where and how to get my information from) or to follow a maddhab. I really want to know that I am praying correctly and following the rules of fiqh to the best of my ability, but I no longer know which way to turn.

On the one hand, people who follow the salaf seem to disagree completely with following a maddhab, and people who follow a maddhab seem to really be anti-salafi. I personally do not like the idea of Muslims being grouped into four schools, but that could just be my nafs and I really do not want to follow something just on a whim. Also, I have met someone who follows a maddhab yet claims to be salafi too.

I would appreciate it if people could give their opinions and explain things better to me, so I have more to base my choice upon. Also I would appreciate if people could provide any resources. I know that we are not scholars, I just don't know which scholar to go to because even that is difficult where I live because there is disagreement.

Jazak'Allahu Khayran for your help and may Allah swt bless your Ramadhaan and answer all your beneficial duas. Ameen.

#2 Al-Siddiq

    Comet

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,311 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 August 2011 - 06:36 AM

wa Aalaikum Assalam

Wayyakum, and inshAllah ta'ala your ramadan is going excellently!


As for the question, it's actually quite simple. As muslims, in origin we should be mujtahideen (those who can give rulings based on islamic evidences for situations). However, we don't all have the capacity or the knowledge to do so, so we are commanded to seek knowledge when we don't know.

This means we must refer to a mujtahid for rulings on different aspects of our lives.


Everyone follows a mujtahid. The salafis follow ibn taymiyyah rahimullah in general, while the people who follow madahib follow either one of the four imams or one of the scholars of that madhab.

It should just be simple division in fiqh. Find the mujtahid you deem as the most righteous and more importantly who you see as having the most correct understanding based on evidences of how he derives rules.


For me, I follow sheikh taqiuddin al nabhani, the founder of hizb ut tahrir. In addition, I'm switching from imam ahmad ibn hanbal to abu ilyaas for salah, and i follow imam shawkani and imam shafi when i cannot find opinions on certain matters.


The importance is not on being a 'salafi' or being a 'madhabi'. It is on following a mujtahid since we are not able to extract rulings just yet. Does that help?

Please ask questions! It will help me as well inshAllah :)

#3 Guest_Confused_*

  • Guests

Posted 07 August 2011 - 10:57 AM

Jazak'Allahu Khayran for your help brother. My husband and I are both looking into it. He is a revert and in his first year of Islam became hanafi because all the people in his acquaintance at the time were hanafi. However he speaks of not feeling connected to the fiqh, for example he doesn't feel right not putting his hands up for every takbir in Salah.

I notice that you mention you follow different scholars for certain things like salah, so I am guessing that is allowed? I used to follow imam abu hanifa as a child, but as I started growing up and reading more into it, I followed Imam shafi's way of salah, and there are certain other things I took from other sources. For the most part, I have just been contacting a handful of scholars when I have questions. I have thus been accused of 'picking and choosing', and told it is dangerous to do that. When I have a ruling I do stick to it, I don't pick and choose based on the situation.

Are there any books on ibn taymiyyah? I would be interested to know how he derives his rulings insha'Allah.

Once again, Jazak'Allahu Khayran for your help. I really appreciate it.

#4 Salaam

    Official Rebel Leader of BoB

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,881 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muslim Capital of Europe

Posted 07 August 2011 - 12:34 PM

i'll answer in 2 posts starting from next inshallah:

#5 Salaam

    Official Rebel Leader of BoB

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,881 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muslim Capital of Europe

Posted 07 August 2011 - 12:35 PM

How did Islamic fiqh develop?
ar - en - es
how was the science of fiqh developed ?

Praise be to Allaah.

During the lifetime of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) the Muslims used to receive the rulings of Islam directly from him. The Qur’aan came down as a teacher, guide and mufti, as Allaah said (interpretation of the meaning):

“They ask you for a legal verdict. Say: “Allaah directs (thus) about Al-Kalaalah (those who leave neither descendants nor ascendants as heirs)…”[al-Nisa’ 4:176]

And it came to explain matters concerning which the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and his companions were uncertain, as in the story of the woman who asked the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) about her husband’s divorcing her by zihaar (a jaahili form of divorce in which the husband says to his wife, “You are to me as my mother’s back”), as a result of which the first verses of Soorat al-Mujaadilah were revealed.

The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to send some of his companions to teach the new Muslims how to worship and to give them legal rulings (fatwa). The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to allow them a certain amount of room in understanding the texts of sharee’ah, then he would approve of their interpretation or correct them. At the time of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) a number of the Sahaabah used to issue fatwas (legal rulings). Some of the scholars said that they numbered fourteen, but in fact there were more than that. The Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) was the imaam (leader) and teacher of mankind and at that time people spoke proper Arabic so whatever variations in interpretation there were, were few and minor. So the death of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) was counted as a great loss to the ummah, because they lost their leader, guide and perfect example.

It was narrated that Anas ibn Maalik said: “After the death of the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), Abu Bakr said to ‘Umar, ‘Let us go to Umm Ayman and visit her as the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) used to do. When they came to her, she wept, and they said to her, ‘Why are you weeping? What is with Allaah is better for His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him).’ She said, ‘I am not weeping because I do not know that what is with Allaah is better for His Messenger (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him); rather I am weeping because the revelation from heaven has come to an end.’ She moved them to tears and they started weeping with her.” (Narrated by Muslim, 2454). But the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) did not die until after the religion had been completed.

One of the characteristics of this religion, which was perfected during the time of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), was that it includes features which qualify it to remain and continue until the end of time.

Therefore this religion and understanding of it remained after the death of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) and it will abide until the Day of Resurrection. After the death of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), the people followed his guidance and the guidance of the Rightly-Guided khaleefahs who followed him. Abu Bakr (may Allaah be pleased with him) used to judge amongst them and issue fatwas to them based on what he found in the Qur’aan and hadeeth. If he could not find an answer, he would go out and ask the Muslims, saying, “Such and such an issue has been referred to me, do you know whether the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) passed a judgement concerning such a matter?” Then perhaps a group of them would come to him, all of them saying that the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had passed a judgement on it. Then Abu Bakr would say, “Praise be to Allaah Who has caused there to be among us those who memorized things from our Prophet.” And if he was unable to find any Sunnah narrated from the Messenger of Allaah (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), he would gather the leaders of the people and the best among them and if they agreed on something he would pass judgement according to that.

‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) did the same after Abu Bakr had died.

Then the Sahaabah (may Allaah be pleased with them) dispersed to different regions as teachers and mujaahideen, after the expansion of the Islamic territory. Each of them used to issue fatwas in accordance with what he knew of the Qur’aan and Sunnah, or the actions of Abu Bakr or ‘Umar, or the conclusions to which his own ijtihaad led him. The muftis among the Sahaabah numbered more than one hundred, and those who issued many fatwas numbered seven, as Ibn al-Qayyim says. They were: ‘Umar ibn al-Khattaab, ‘Ali ibn Abi Taalib, ‘Abd-Allaah ibn Mas’ood, ‘Aa’ishah Umm al-Mu’mineen, Zayd ibn Thaabit, ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Abbaas and ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with them all).

‘Umar (may Allaah be pleased with him) and his son, and Zayd ibn Thaabit (may Allaah be pleased with them), were in Madeenah, and many students became scholars at their hands, such as Saalim ibn ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar, Naafi’ and others. Their knowledge was passed to the seven fuqaha’ and ultimately to Imaam Maalik ibn Anas al-Asbahi.

Ibn Mas’ood and then ‘Ali were in Kufa, and a number of the Taabi’een learned from them, such as ‘Ilqimah, al-Aswad, Masrooq, Shurayh al-Qaadi, Silah ibn Zafar and many others besides them, until that knowledge reached Imaam Abu Haneefah al-Nu’maan ibn Thaabit.

Fiqh and knowledge spread throughout the ummah from the companions of Ibn Mas’ood, the companions of Zayd ibn Thaabit, the companions of ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Umar, and the companions of ‘Abd-Allaah ibn ‘Abbaas. That happened in Kufa, Madeenah and Makkah, respectively. These Taabi’een used to issue fatwas when the greatest Sahaabah were present, and they granted them permission to do that.

For example, Ibn ‘Umar used to say of Sa’eed ibn al-Musayyib: he is one of the muftis or one of those to be followed.

And he said of him: if the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him) had seen him, he would have been happy with him.

Via these people, knowledge spread far and wide. Then the ahaadeeth were compiled in books and the numbers of students increased who occupied themselves with memorizing them and writing them down; then knowledge spread throughout the earth. Most of the people were religiously-committed and aware, and this prevented anyone from speaking without knowledge or claiming to be a scholar when he was not qualified to describe himself as such. Then differences because widespread and people became involved in the field of knowledge who would have been better off refraining from it. But by the wisdom of Allaah the religion was regulated and preserved by imams whom the ummah agreed that they were leaders and knowledgeable and that they had reached the utmost degree of knowledge of rulings and fatwas. Allaah caused them to become well known and their virtue spread throughout the world. Students flocked to them to learn and study, and their views were compiled in books. The opinions of the Sunni schools of thought which followed the truth of the Qur’aan and Sunnah and which rejected innovations in religion (bid’ah), according to what was transmitted by the students of the great imams, were recorded according to what was transmitted by the students of these great scholars, so the views of each imaam became a madhhab that is followed.

The most famous of these madhhabs nowadays are just four: the Hanafi, Maaliki, Shaafa’i and Hanbali madhhabs. The followers of these madhhabs are agreed on most matters and on the most important issues of religion, and the differences in understanding and in the evidence that reached them have to do with minor issues. All of them are following something good, may Allaah have mercy on them. Then each of these madhhabs developed in ways which it would take too long to explain here, until things became as they are nowadays, where each madhhab has books containing its issues and methods of deriving rulings and interpreting evidence. And among the imams there are, praise be to Allaah, mujtahids who can produce rulings on contemporary events and issues by means of the understanding that Allaah has bestowed upon them, using ijtihaad, qiyaas (analogy), the principles of the objectives of sharee’ah, the sayings of previous scholars, and the principles of usool al-fiqh. Thus fiqh continued to be a rich discipline, comprehending all the issues of life which the Muslims need to know about.

At all times there is someone who is showing the correct way, based on evidence, who recognizes the truth concerning a certain issue and he knows how to reach the correct conclusion. The scholars could not agree on something that is incorrect, hence the ummah cannot all follow falsehood. We ask Allaah to cause us to understand His religion and to bless us with knowledge and righteous deeds. And Allaah knows best.

For more information see:

Al-Fikr al-Saami fi Taareekh al-Fiqh al-Islaami and Taareekh al-Fiqh al-Islami by ‘Umar ibn Sulaymaan al-Ashqar.

And Allaah knows best.
Islam Q&A
Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid

#6 Salaam

    Official Rebel Leader of BoB

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,881 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muslim Capital of Europe

Posted 07 August 2011 - 12:35 PM

Is it obligatory to follow a particular madhhab?
ar - en - ur
Is it mandatory for a muslim to follow a specific madhab (maliki, hanafi, hanbali,etc)?
If it is so, what madhab is the best? Is it true that Abou Hanifa's madhab is the most followed in the muslim world?.

Praise be to Allaah.

It is not obligatory for a Muslim to follow any particular madhhab among these four. People vary in their level of understanding and ability to derive rulings from the evidence. There are some for whom it is permissible to follow (taqleed), and indeed it may be obligatory in their case. There are others who can only follow the shar’i evidence. In Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah this question was answered in a detailed manner, which is worth quoting here in full.

Question:

What is the ruling on following one of the four madhhabs in all cases and situations?

The Committee replied:

Praise be to Allaah, and blessings and peace be upon His Messenger and his family and companions.

Firstly: the four madhhabs are named after the four imams – Imam Abu Haneefah, Imam Maalik, Imam al-Shaafa’i and Imam Ahmad.

Secondly: These imams learned fiqh (jurisprudence) from the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they are mujtahideen in this regard. The mujtahid either gets it right, in which case he will have two rewards, the reward for his ijtihaad and the reward for getting it right, or he will get it wrong, in which case he will be rewarded for his ijtihaad and will be forgiven for his mistake.

Thirdly: the one who is able to derive rulings from the Qur’aan and Sunnah should take from them like those who came before him; it is not right for him to follow blindly (taqleed) when he is believes that the truth lies elsewhere. Rather he should follow that which he believes is the truth. It is permissible for him to follow in matters in which he is unable to come to a conclusion based on the Qur’aan and Sunnah and he needs guidelines concerning a particular issue.

Fourthly: Whoever does not have the ability to derive rulings himself is permitted to follow one whom he feels comfortable following. If he is not comfortable following him then he should ask until he finds someone with whom he is comfortable.

Fifthly: From the above it is clear that we should not follow their opinions in all situations and at all times, because they may make mistakes, but we may follow their views that are sound and are based on the evidence.

Fataawa al-Lajnah, 5/28

It says in Fataawa al-Lajnah, no. 3323:

Whoever is qualified to derive rulings from the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and has strong knowledge in that regard, even if that is with the help of the legacy of fiqh that we have inherited from earlier scholars of Islam, has the right to do that, so he can act upon it himself and explain it in disputes and issue fatwas to those who consult him. Whoever is not qualified to do that has to ask trustworthy people who so that he may learn the rulings from their books and act upon that, without limiting his asking or his reading to one of the scholars of the four madhhabs. Rather people refer to the four imams because they are so well known and their books are well written and widely available.

Whoever says that it is obligatory for the learned people to follow the scholars blindly in all cases is making a mistake and being inflexible, and is thinking that these learned people are inadequate, and he is restricting something that is broad in scope.

Whoever says that we should limit following to the four madhhabs is also mistaken, because he is restricting something that is broad in scope with no evidence for doing so. With regard to the common (i.e., uneducated) man there is no difference between the four imams and others such as al-Layth ibn Sa’d, al-Awzaa’i and other fuqaha’.

Fataawa al-Lajnah, 5/41

It says in Fatwa no. 1591:

None of them called people to follow his madhhab, or was partisan in following it, or obliged anyone else to act in accordance with it or with a specific madhhab. Rather they used to call people to follow the Qur’aan and Sunnah, and they would comment on the texts of Islam, and explain its basic principles and discuss minor issues according to general guidelines, and issue fatwas concerning what people asked about, without obliging any of their students or anyone else to follow their views. Rather they criticized those who did that and said that their opinions should be cast aside if they went against a saheeh hadeeth. One of them said: “If the hadeeth is saheeh then that is my madhhab.” May Allaah have mercy on them all.

It is not obligatory for anyone to follow a particular madhhab, rather we should strive to learn the truth if possible, or to seek the help of Allaah in doing so, then to rely on the legacy that the earlier Muslim scholars left behind for those who came after them, thus making it easier for them to understand and apply the texts. Whoever cannot derive rulings from the texts etc for some reason that prevents him from doing so should ask trustworthy scholars for whatever rulings of sharee’ah he needs, because Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

“So ask the people of the Reminder [Scriptures — the Tawraat (Torah), the Injeel (Gospel)] if you do not know”

[al-Anbiya’ 21:7]

So he has to strive to ask one whom he trusts among those who are well known for their knowledge, virtue, piety and righteousness.

Fataawa al-Lajnah al-Daa’imah, 5/56

The madhhab of Abu Haneefah (may Allaah have mercy on him) is the most widespread madhhab among the Muslims, and perhaps one of the reasons for that is that the Ottoman caliphs followed this madhhab and they ruled the Muslim lands for more than six centuries. That does not mean that the madhhab of Abu Haneefah is the most sound madhhab or that every ijtihaad in it is correct, rather like other madhhabs it contains some things that are correct and some that are incorrect. What the believer must do is to follow the truth and what is correct, regardless of who says it.

And Allaah knows best.
Islam Q&A

#7 Salaam

    Official Rebel Leader of BoB

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,881 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Muslim Capital of Europe

Posted 07 August 2011 - 12:45 PM

In conclusion in regarding to usul al fiqh a laymen must follow a madhhab or a scholar expert in the field of usul al fiqh, but madhhab prefered as the 4 madhhab is known through out the world and has been refined over hundreads of years something individual scholars view havent been, the reason why we must follow a madhhab is because we dont have the ability to make judgmeent between rulings, so rather then making a guess and choose from our own desires we stick to the madhhab or the schoalr we follow.

Till today one of the best articles on usul al fiqh i have read is this one so take a look at this inshallah it will clear everything :

http://www.7cgen.com...showtopic=43943

and salafi follow ibn taymiyyah, strange, ibn taymiyyah himself followed the hanbali fiqh

Edited by Salaam, 07 August 2011 - 12:45 PM.


#8 Umm Baseerah

  • Sisters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,276 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:دار الشر والفساد

Posted 07 August 2011 - 11:51 PM

The key here is to take a balanced approach to this. Do not adopt the 'madhhabistic' mentality of basing the religion on the opinions of one madhhab, and never straying from it. And do not follow the other extreme of completely disregarding the madhaahib. The general principle is that a layman has no madhhab. He is required to refer to the people of knowledge, and then follow the fatwa he feels is closest to the truth. The burden of ijtihaad does is not place on us, so to say 'go directly to the Qur'aan and Sunnah' (like some do) is a simplistic thing to say.

View PostAl-Siddiq, on 07 August 2011 - 06:36 AM, said:

wa Aalaikum Assalam

Wayyakum, and inshAllah ta'ala your ramadan is going excellently!


As for the question, it's actually quite simple. As muslims, in origin we should be mujtahideen (those who can give rulings based on islamic evidences for situations). However, we don't all have the capacity or the knowledge to do so, so we are commanded to seek knowledge when we don't know.

This means we must refer to a mujtahid for rulings on different aspects of our lives.


Everyone follows a mujtahid. The salafis follow ibn taymiyyah rahimullah in general, while the people who follow madahib follow either one of the four imams or one of the scholars of that madhab.

It should just be simple division in fiqh. Find the mujtahid you deem as the most righteous and more importantly who you see as having the most correct understanding based on evidences of how he derives rules.


For me, I follow sheikh taqiuddin al nabhani, the founder of hizb ut tahrir. In addition, I'm switching from imam ahmad ibn hanbal to abu ilyaas for salah, and i follow imam shawkani and imam shafi when i cannot find opinions on certain matters.


The importance is not on being a 'salafi' or being a 'madhabi'. It is on following a mujtahid since we are not able to extract rulings just yet. Does that help?

Please ask questions! It will help me as well inshAllah :)


With all due respect akh, it's not entirely correct to say 'salafees follow Ibn Taymiyyah'. The reality is that they don't refer to Ibn Taymiyyah(rh) for anything other than Aqeedah. When it comes to fiqh, they hang on to the words of the more contemporary Shuyookh. The irony is that a lot of these scholars don't see a problem in using a madhhab to facilitate you in learning fiqh. Shaykh Saalih al Fawzaan(rh) based his book mulakkhas al fiqhi on a sharh of zaad ul mustaqni (al rawd al murbi by Imaam al Buhooti)! So it makes me laugh when these neo salafees try to discredit the madhaahib.

#9 Al-Siddiq

    Comet

  • Brothers
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,311 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 August 2011 - 12:37 AM

View PostConfused, on 07 August 2011 - 10:57 AM, said:

Jazak'Allahu Khayran for your help brother. My husband and I are both looking into it. He is a revert and in his first year of Islam became hanafi because all the people in his acquaintance at the time were hanafi. However he speaks of not feeling connected to the fiqh, for example he doesn't feel right not putting his hands up for every takbir in Salah.

I notice that you mention you follow different scholars for certain things like salah, so I am guessing that is allowed? I used to follow imam abu hanifa as a child, but as I started growing up and reading more into it, I followed Imam shafi's way of salah, and there are certain other things I took from other sources. For the most part, I have just been contacting a handful of scholars when I have questions. I have thus been accused of 'picking and choosing', and told it is dangerous to do that. When I have a ruling I do stick to it, I don't pick and choose based on the situation.

Are there any books on ibn taymiyyah? I would be interested to know how he derives his rulings insha'Allah.

Once again, Jazak'Allahu Khayran for your help. I really appreciate it.


Wayyakum, it's not a problem.


Firstly, watch this video on taqleed (following someone):




For salah, this is the best book I have ever seen on the topic in english (it is long and comprehensive, but it should answer all your prayer related questions):

http://islamicink.org/ (click book of salah).



Now these aside, generally in our times we we wound want to decide to follow a scholar that we trust most on islam, and who displays righteousness in action completely and it would be best to have evidences and an explanation of them.

I trust taqiuddin nabahani, because he displays exceptional knowledge and his life was full of righteousness. He never worked under kufr governments and always had his priorities right. More importantly, he gave rulings with evidences and clearly explained them in detail.

On topics he does not cover I got to imam shawkani, but since I do not have a lot of material for him, I follow after him imam shafi.


On more specific topics, I used to be hanbali in salah because I was raised on it. However, after reading the book on salah, and getting answers to salah related questions that are relevant more to our time, I followed him on that topic. Note that I did not pick and choose, nor did I pick one hukm of salah in one area, and another in another area. Rather, I stuck to the mujtahid in general, and on a topic I deferred to another mujtahid because he displayed better capability and elaborated more extensively.



Now the most important point ukhti, was what you mentioned about how your husband feels. It is important to remember that our feelings are based on certain ideas we hold, or on our environment. But Islam is there to change everything so that we base our decisions, our feelings, our actions and everything else only on it. We follow a mutjahid only because we cannot make ijtihaad ourselves, so we trust based on evidence that what this person says is the hukm of Allah. Most important thing is to study islam as much as you can and be sincere in your search =).

I don't have anything on the usul of ibn taymiyya, but I do have a book in general on usul al fiqh. I think first you and your husband should take a look at it, then we can look further for more material (this is a really deep topic).

http://www.revivalpu...lfiqh-p-13.html

There might be an e-copy, but it's only 5 pounds and a really good reference to have in my opinion!


Let me know what you think inshAllah!

Wa Aalaikum Assalam




Reply to this topic


This post will need approval from a moderator before this post is shown.

  

1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

Original Skin by CrustyGeek/ReSkinned by Dumbledore for TPPSkinning.com

All communications made available as part of this forum and any opinions, advice, statements, views or other information expressed are solely provided by, and the responsibility of, the person posting such communication and not of 7cgen.com or any of it's administration team. Click here for full disclaimer.